Liner Notes - Linus & Lucy - The Music of Vince Guaraldi

Vince Guaraldi (pronounced “gerr-all-dee”) once said that he wanted to write standards, not just hits, and he did just that,” says George Winston. “His music is very much a part of the fabric of American culture, but not many people know the man behind the music. Play any one of the Peanuts® pieces for most kids, and they will usually say right away, ‘That’s Charlie Brown music.’ ” Vince’s soundtracks for the Peanuts® television specials from the 1960s and 1970s continue to delight millions of people around the world, and many his albums remain in print. “I play more of Vince’s songs than those of any other composer. A lot of his music is very seasonal, and it reminds me very much of my childhood in Montana. It generates joy, warmth, and humor, as well as whimsical feelings, childhood memories, and images of his hometown, San Francisco. I want to do what I can to help keep his musical legacy alive.”

Born in 1949, George Winston’s childhood was spent mainly in Montana, as well as in Mississippi and Florida. Growing up during the heyday of pop instrumental music in the late 1950s and the early 1960s (there were 30 instrumental hits in the Top 40 in 1961), he listened to artists such as Floyd Cramer (Last Date and On the Rebound) and Let’s Go and Hot Pepper [Flip Flop & Bob]), The Ventures (Walk Don't Run and Walk Don’t Run 64 and Perfidia), Booker T and the MG's (Green Onions, and Hip Hug-Her, and Groovin' and Time is Tight and Hang ‘Em High and Melting Pot and Soul Limbo), King Curtis (Soul Twist), Lonnie Mack (Memphis), Link Wray (Rumble), The Chantays (Pipeline), Kokomo (Asia Minor and Roy’s Tune), Jorgen Ingmann (Apache), Santo & Johnny (Sleep Walk and Tear Drop), Kenny Ball and his Jazzmen (Midnight In Moscow and The Green Leaves of Summer), The Village Stompers (Washington Square and From Russia With Love), Bill Black's Combo (Smokie--Part 2 and White Silver Sands), Johnny and The Hurricanes (Red River Rock), The Champs (Tequila and Limbo Rock), Dick Dale (Misirlou), The Marketts (Out Of Limits), The String-A-Longs (Wheels), Billy Joe & the Checkmates (Percolator), Cozy Cole (Topsy -Part 2), B. Bumble & the Stingers (Nut Rocker and Bumble Boogie), Jack Fina (Bumble Boogie). Bill Doggett (Honky Tonk--Part 2), Mar-Keys (Last Night), Willie Mitchell (20-75 and Soul Serenade), Dave "Baby" Cortez (Rinky Dink, and The Happy Organ, and Come Back To Lonely Me), Eskew Reeder [aka "Esquerita"] (Green Door), the Phil Upchurch Combo (You Can't Sit Down--Part 2), Bill Justis (Raunchy), Duane Eddy (Rebel Rouser and Forty Miles of Bad Road), The Ramrods (Ghost Riders in the Sky), Ace Cannon (Tuff), Travis Wammack (Scratchy), Mongo Santamaria (Watermelon Man), Jimmy Smith (Walk on the Wild Side, and The Cat), Jimmy McGriff (I've Got a Woman--Part 1), the Dave Brubeck Quartet (Take Five), Cannonball Adderly (This Here and Mercy Mercy Mercy and The Work Song and Country Preacher), The T-Bones (No Matter What Shape), Sandy Nelson (Teen Beat), Pete Drake (Forever), Bert Kaempfert (That Happy Feeling and A Swingin' Safari), Jack Nitzsche (The Lonely Surfer), Bill Pursell (Our Winter Love), Martin Denny (Quiet Village), Herb Alpert & The Tijuana Brass (A Taste of Honey and The Lonely Bull and Mexican Shuffle and What Now My Love and The Work Song), Henry Mancini (Peter Gunn, and The Pink Panther, and Baby Elephant Walk), Nelson Riddle (Route 66 Theme), Neal Hefti (Bathtub Saturday Night), George Shearing (Lullaby of Birdland), Horst Jankowski (A Walk in the Black Forest), Ramsey Lewis (The "In" Crowd and Wade in the Water and Hang on Sloopy and High Heel Sneakers), and Vince Guaraldi (Cast Your Fate to the Wind and Linus & Lucy and Skating and Treat Street). He would listen to the radio faithfully for the 30 seconds before the hourly news when they would play instrumentals.

It was around this time that George first remembers hearing Vince Guaraldi. “Like many people outside of San Francisco, I heard Vince in the early 1960s when his hit single Cast Your Fate to the Wind was getting airplay on the pop music radio stations. What set Cast Your Fate apart was that it was the rare jazz hit single.” (other jazz hit singles from around this time period were Topsy, Part II by Cozy Cole from 1958, Madison Time by pianist Ray Bryant from 1960, Take Five, by the Dave Brubeck Quartet from 1961, Desafinado by Stan Getz & Charlie Byrd from 1962, Girl from Ipanema by Stan Getz & Astrud Gilberto from 1964, and by the Ramsey Lewis Trio The In-Crown from 1965, Wade in the Water from 1966, Hang On Sloopy (1965), and Mercy, Mercy, Mercy by Cannonball Adderly from 1967).

In December 1965 George again heard Vince’s music when he watched the first broadcast of the Peanuts® T.V. special, A Charlie Brown Christmas (which is still broadcast every year). “I loved his soundtrack,” says George, “and the next day I bought the album. From then on I collected all of Vince’s records.”

George began playing organ and electric piano after high school in 1967. In 1971, after hearing records by the legendary stride pianists, Thomas “Fats” Waller and Teddy Wilson, he switched to solo piano and began working on his own brand of instrumental music, putting together songs of his own and arranging pieces by others, such as Vince Guaraldi. “When I started playing piano, I would anxiously anticipate and watch each Peanuts® special to see what new Vince Guaraldi tunes I could learn,” George remembers. “In 1971 I had the pleasure of meeting Vince at a jazz club in Palo Alto, California. He was very gracious and encouraging when I occasionally had the opportunity to play intermission piano between his sets.”

In 1972 George recorded his first solo piano album. Since then he has recorded five others with specific themes in the melodic genre he describes as rural folk piano. George has also recorded solo piano and solo guitar soundtracks for three children’s animated videos, including a Peanuts® special. “In 1988 a dream came true when producers Lee and Glenn Mendelson asked me to record the soundtrack for This Is America, Charlie Brown: The Birth of the Constitution. I played a lot of Vince’s songs, and included Cast Your Fate to the Wind because I wanted to use one of his songs that hadn’t been used in a previous soundtrack. Lee also asked me to play some songs on the harpsichord to help establish the feeling of the colonial period.”

Today George’s main musical expression is the live solo concert. He has been most influenced by the playing of the New Orleans R&B solo pianist James Booker, and R&B/jazz pianist Henry Butler. He has also been inspired by Professor Longhair and Dr. John. “On this album, I base quite a bit of my left-hand work, as well as some of my right-hand fills, on techniques learned from James Booker,” George says. “He was the first one to take R&B, soul music, and New Orleans music and develop a full-blown solo piano style out of these traditions. James Booker’s musical language permeates the way I play everything: stride piano, R&B, and even my rural folk style. Since Vince Guaraldi almost always played in a trio or in larger settings, I mix the Booker techniques along with Vince’s to achieve the full sound I want when playing his songs as solo pieces. Vince did record a few beautiful solo piano pieces, such as Autumn Leaves, Yesterdays, Never Never Land, and In Remembrance of Me. He also played exquisite solo piano introductions to his piece Theme to Grace, and to standards like Fly Me to the Moon and The Christmas Song (Chestnuts Roasting on an Open Fire).

George continues, “I feel Vince’s playing can be divided into four main categories: first, lyrical and impressionistic jazz, such as Cast Your Fate, The Great Pumpkin Waltz, and Remembrance; second, his Latin-tinged music of which Treat Street and The Masked Marvel are examples; third, mainstream jazz/bebop; and fourth, his Peanuts® music, like Linus & Lucy where his left-hand style often reflects his early boogie-woogie influences. Vince had a very distinctive way of using jazz chords with wide voicings, as well as tone clusters, especially on the dominant 7th and tonic major 7th chords. He often used straight major triads, which is rare among jazz pianists. He favored the major keys of F, Ab, and C, sometimes Eb and Bb, and occasionally G and D. His favorite minor keys were F minor and C minor, and sometimes D minor, G minor and A minor.”

Born in San Francisco in 1928, Vince Guaraldi began piano lessons around age seven. As a teen, he taught himself boogie-woogie and blues by listening to masters such as Jimmy Yancey, Meade “Lux” Lewis, Albert Ammons and Pete Johnson. He was also later inspired by bebop jazz pianist Bud Powell and impressionistic jazz pianist Bill Evans. In 1949 Vince played his first professional gigs with former Thelonious Monk saxophonist Kermit Scott. He also worked as intermission pianist at the Black Hawk in San Francisco, where greats like Art Tatum headlined. In 1950 he joined jazz vibraphonist Cal Tjader’s combo, which inspired his interest in Latin music. Around 1956 Vince began to hold down a steady gig at the hungry i in San Francisco with his trio, which included guitarist Eddie Duran and bassist Dean Reilly. He also signed with Fantasy Records, in addition to taking over the piano in Woody Herman’s Thundering Herd for a few tours.

During the early 1960s, as Vince’s recognition grew, he received many offers to tour outside the Bay Area. “He could have done a lot more,” film producer Lee Mendelson says, “but he liked San Francisco and playing music around the local clubs.” Reflecting both his eclectic personal tastes and the experimental spirit of the times, Vince led a series of stellar groups that mixed blues, modern jazz, Latin, bossa nova and pop. In 1962 he scored unexpected commercial success when his composition, Cast Your Fate to the Wind, became a hit. Originally the B side of the jazz single, Samba de Orpheus, the Luiz Bonfa/Antonio Carlos Jobim theme from the classic 1959 film, BLACK ORPHEUS, Cast Your Fate took off when two Sacramento DJs flipped the record over and began playing it on the air every hour. The song wound up high on the pop charts for eighteen weeks, and its success attracted the attention of creative people outside of the jazz milieu.

In 1963 Mendelson was planning the first television special based on the Peanuts® comic strip with creator Charles Schulz. He remembers driving into San Francisco when Cast Your Fate to the Wind came on the radio. “I was thinking about what kind of music to use,” Lee says. “When I heard that song, something clicked. I found out that Vince lived in San Francisco, and I got in touch with him.” Vince had been reading Peanuts® for years and had two kids of his own, so he loved the project. Within a short time he called Lee and told him he had something to play for him. “That’s the first time I heard Linus & Lucy,” says Lee. “As soon as I heard it, I knew it was perfect. When I brought the first tape for A Charlie Brown Christmas to Charles Schulz, he fell in love with it. I have always felt that one of the key elements that made that show was the music. It gave it a contemporary sound that appealed to all ages.” Vince went on to score fifteen Peanuts® specials and one feature film until his untimely death in 1976 at the age of 47.

“Two generations have now grown up with Vince Guaraldi’s music,” Lee says. “If people hear just one or two bass notes of the intro to Linus & Lucy, they cheer. The Peanuts® programs and Vince’s music were such a wonderful marriage. It’s a shame it got cut off so soon, but people like George are perpetuating it, for which we are very appreciative.” A great article on Vince Guaraldi by the great pianist and author Bob Doerchuk, titled “Vince Guaraldi – Remembering the Man Behind ‘Cast Your Fate To The Wind”, is in the July 1981 edition of Keyboard Magazine (www.keyboardmagazine.com). Download article HERE.


1. Cast Your Fate to the Wind 6:23

Vince’s impressionistic standard and hit composed sometime between the late 1950s and the early 1960s, Cast Your Fate to the Wind first appeared on his 1962 album JAZZ IMPRESSIONS OF BLACK ORPHEUS, a collection based on his interpretations of Antonio Carlos Jobim and Luiz Bonfa songs from the classic 1959 film. Vince’s success with Cast Your Fate became the focus of the three-part documentary film THE ANATOMY OF A HIT, produced by the late Ralph J. Gleason (1917-1975) in 1963 for PBS television. Cast Your Fate to the Wind was originally the B side of the 45 RPM single from the album, with the A side being Samba De Orpheus (the Luiz Bonfa/Antonio Carlos Jobim main theme from the film BLACK ORPHEUS), but two disc jockeys in Sacramento, California turned it over and played Cast Your Fate to the Wind every hour instead, which led to it becoming a hit. As a testament to Cast Your Fate’s long-standing appeal, dozens of artists have recorded it through the years. Two other notable hit renditions, both from 1965 with somewhat similar arrangements to each other (but not to Vince’s) in the middle section are: an instrumental version by the Sounds Orchestral with pianist John Pearson (reaching #10 in 1965), and a minor hit vocal version by Steve Alaimo

Vince’s version of Cast Your Fate to the Wind also appears on the album VINCE GUARALDI-GREATEST HITS. Four other versions by Vince have been issued on recordings produced by his son David: a live version from the 1960s on the album THE CHARLIE BROWN SUITE & OTHER FAVORITES, and another live version and a previously unissued studio version from the 1960s, both on the album NORTH BEACH, as well as a live version on the album VINCE GUARALDI TRIO – LIVE ON THE AIR (all on the Guaraldi Family label D&D Records www.vinceguaraldi.com).

In this composition Vince used one of his favorite chord progressions, the Latin-based (and universal) I to IV to V chords (here with the Ab Major, Db Major, and Eb Major chords), and he also used it effectively in pieces such as Skating (song #2), A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving (song #6), Treat Street (song #7), and You’re in Love Charlie Brown (song #11), Christmas is Coming, song # 18] and in other compositions of his. Cast Your Fate is in the key of Ab, one of Vince Guaraldi’s favorite keys, and I was inspired by Monte Budwig’s bowed bass in the main melody verses of Vince’s original version to sometimes pluck the piano string on the lowest Ab note to get a similar type of sustain.

The improvised solo in the middle of Cast Your Fate has been recorded many different ways by various artists. My arrangement has three parts: the first part is a short impressionistic section; for the second section I play a progression that Vince used in his version of Little Drummer Boy (called My Little Drum on the album A CHARLIE BROWN CHRISTMAS; and Vince recorded another version of it with the title Menino Pequeno da Bateria on his album FROM ALL SIDES); and for the third section I play the Brazilian folk tune Viro Mundo Penba, as arranged by the late great Brazilian guitarist Bola Sete (1923-1987), on his solo guitar album OCEAN MEMORIES (www.bolasete.com). Vince and Bola first met through jazz trumpet legend Dizzy Gillespie at the 1962 Monterey Jazz Festival, and they collaborated on three albums for the Fantasy label in the mid-1960s, as well as for a program filmed in 1963 for Ralph J. Gleason’s PBS television show JAZZ CASUAL (now available on CD and DVD).

At the end of the song here, the piano is muted by damping the strings with the left hand, while playing the keys with the right hand.

2. Skating 3:02

In the key of C, Skating was composed for a lyrical moment in the very first of the Peanuts® television episodes, A CHARLIE BROWN CHRISTMAS, which first aired in December 1965. It appears in a scene where the children are trying to catch snowflakes on their tongues. Vince also recorded another version of this song, with the title Snoopy on Ice, for the 1970 feature film and soundtrack album A BOY NAMED CHARLIE BROWN.

Two of Vince Guaraldi’s many fortes are evident in this song: composing songs with different and distinct sections, and creating beautiful textures and dynamics in the moments of the transitions between those sections.

3. Linus & Lucy 3:27

Vince’s love for the Boogie-Woogie piano tradition is reflected in Linus & Lucy, his most popular signature piece. A rollicking left hand showpiece in the key of Ab, its main melody uses right hand baroque trumpet-type voicings of: a Major sixth (with the notes C & a higher Ab played together), then a fifth played above that (with the notes Eb & a higher Bb together), and a Major third played above that (with the notes Ab & a higher C together). A lover of classical music, Charles Schulz promoted the music of Beethoven through the character of Schroeder. For the A CHARLIE BROWN CHRISTMAS episode Vince played part of Beethoven’s Für Elise, and also gave Schroeder ample opportunity to improvise in a jazz mode. Linus & Lucy lets him do that during the memorable scene where Schroeder is playing the piano and the kids are dancing while Charlie Brown is trying to get them to rehearse for the annual Christmas play (and I always do this song at the solo piano dances that I play featuring R&B and slow dance songs). A CHARLIE BROWN CHRISTMAS was first broadcast in December 1965 and is still broadcast every year. Linus & Lucy can be heard in eight of Vince’s Peanuts® scores: A CHARLIE BROWN CHRISTMAS, IT’S THE GREAT PUMPKIN CHARLIE BROWN, YOU’RE NOT ELECTED CHARLIE BROWN, HE’S YOUR DOG CHARLIE BROWN, A BOY NAMED CHARLIE BROWN, THERE’S NO TIME FOR LOVE CHARLIE BROWN, IT’S THE EASTER BEAGLE CHARLIE BROWN, and BE MY VALENTINE CHARLIE BROWN; and the bridge part of Linus & Lucy was featured in the episodes IT WAS A SHORT SUMMER CHARLIE BROWN and YOU’RE A GOOD SPORT CHARLIE BROWN. His original version appeared on the 1965 soundtrack album A CHARLIE BROWN CHRISTMAS, and the same track was also on his earlier 1964 album (JAZZ IMPRESSIONS OF) A BOY NAMED CHARLIE BROWN (and the same track is also on the albums CHARLIE BROWN’S HOLIDAY HITS and VINCE GUARALDI-GREATEST HITS). He recorded another version of it for his 1968 album OH, GOOD GRIEF!, which featured improvisational jazz versions of eight of his popular Peanuts® pieces: Linus & Lucy, The Great Pumpkin Waltz, You’re In Love Charlie Brown, Peppermint Patty, and The Red Baron, as well as Rain Rain Go Away, Oh Good Grief, and He’s Your Dog Charlie Brown. Five other versions by Vince have also been issued on recordings produced by Vince’s son David: a studio version from the 1960s and a live version from 1968 with an orchestra, both on THE CHARLIE BROWN SUITE & OTHER FAVORITES, another live version from the 1960s on NORTH BEACH, as well as a live version on the album VINCE GUARALDI TRIO – LIVE ON THE AIR, and a studio version on VINCE GUARALDI AND THE LOST CUES FROM THE CHARLIE BROWN TELEVISION SPECIALS VOLUME 2, all five issued on the Guaraldi Family D&D label - www.vinceguaraldi.com.

I also recorded Linus & Lucy in 1988 for the soundtrack to THIS IS AMERICA CHARLIE BROWN: THE BIRTH OF THE CONSTITUTION. Of special note - in the touching end scene of another episode in the eight part series THIS IS AMERICA CHARLIE BROWN, titled THE HEROES OF AMERICA, Lucy asks Charlie Brown to pick his favorite song of all time, and Charlie Brown says that it is Linus & Lucy by a musician named Vince Guaraldi and hums it. “I cry every time I see that,” Lee Mendelson says. “We did it as a tribute to Vince.” (Also see song #19 for a newer alternate version).

4. The Great Pumpkin Waltz 3:56

This poignant jazz waltz, in the keys of C minor and Eb Major, formed the musical centerpiece in the October 1966 episode IT’S THE GREAT PUMPKIN, CHARLIE BROWN. “By then,” Lee recalls, “I’d turn the storyboards over to Vince and he would go do the music on his own. Once he’d get an idea, he was very spontaneous, as jazz is. He also came up with a few other ideas for the show, such as suggesting the use of the muted trombone for the voice of the teacher.” It was also briefly featured in the 1976 episode YOU’RE A GOOD SPORT CHARLIE BROWN. Vince also recorded this song on his 1968 album OH, GOOD GRIEF!. A live version from 1968 with an orchestra has also been issued (with the title Happiness Is) on the album THE CHARLIE BROWN SUITE & OTHER FAVORITES. A version from the soundtrack of the episode is on the album CHARLIE BROWN’S HOLIDAY HITS.

The Great Pumpkin Waltz features Vince’s signature descending chord progression that also appears with many different variations on his compositions Monterey (song #5), Charlie Brown’s All-Stars (song #10), You’re in Love Charlie Brown (song #11), Peppermint Patty (song #12), Bon Voyage (song #13), and Remembrance (song #15),as well as in Christmas Time Is Here, and Happiness Is. His descending chord progression is basically seven chords:

1. starting on the flat V minor 7 chord;
2. to the iv minor 6 chord;
3. to the I chord in the first inversion(with the third in the bass);
4. to the flat iii diminished 7 chord;
5. to the ii minor 7 chord;
6. to the V7 chord, with any of the many variations the V7 chord can have, such as with the flat 9th, the13th, or the 11th;
7. and resolving to the I chord, with any of the many variations that a I chord can have, such as with the Major 7th, the 9th, or the 6th with the 9th


A variation on this chord progression that Vince sometimes used was:
1. starting on the vi minor chord;
2. to the I chord in the second inversion (with the fifth in the bass);
3. then playing the seven chords of the progression listed just above. Examples of this variation are in his compositions Monterey (song #5) and Bon Voyage (song #13).

Vince used this chord progression prominently in the Major keys of F, Ab, and Eb, as well as occasionally in G minor and D minor. He was also influenced by similar chord progressions in some of the Brazilian Bossa Nova songs that he loved so much, as well as by variations of those chord progressions also used in American jazz standards (and conversely, American jazz was an influence on the Brazilian Bossa Nova tradition as well), in songs such as Marvin Fisher’s When Sunny Gets Blue, jazz pianist Bobby Timmons’ This Here, as well as jazz pianist Art Tatum’s use of it in his wonderful variations in songs, jazz pianist Oscar Peterson’s use of it as well, guitarist Ted Greene’s use of it in his arrangements of standards as solo guitar pieces, and more.

One of the many jazz waltzes Vince composed. Vince Guaraldi (with at least 13) and pianist Bill Evans (with at least 13) were the most prolific composers of jazz pieces in 3/4 time. Vince’s jazz waltzes included The Great Pumpkin Waltz (song #4 on the LINUS & LUCY album), Skating (song #3 on the LINUS & LUCY album), and You’re In Love Charlie Brown (song #11 on the LINUS & LUCY album); as well as Be My Valentine Charlie Brown [aka Heartburn Waltz] (song #8 on the LOVE WILL COME album), You’re Not Elected Charlie Brown [aka Incumbent Waltz] (song #9 on the LOVE WILL COME album), Bus Blues (also as part of the medley You’re Elected Charlie Brown/ Little Birdie – #9 on the LOVE WILL COME album), Rain Rain Go Away (song #14 on the LOVE WILL COME album), Love Will Come 2 (song #16 on the LOVE WILL COME album); as well as Christmas Time Is Here, Baseball Theme, Happiness Is, and a short theme toward the end of the episode YOU’RE A GOOD SPORT CHARLIE BROWN. He also sometimes played the song It’s a Mystery Charlie Brown as a waltz, as well as in 4/4 time (song #4 on the LOVE WILL COME album, and titled Woodstock, and played in 4/4 time); and also 2 jazz waltzes from the soundtrack Vince scored in 1965, BAY OF GOLD (it is about the history of San Francisco and you can see it at https://diva.sfsu.edu/collections/sfbatv/bundles/205204. He sometimes played the song (or part of the song) There’s No Time for Love, Charlie Brown as a waltz (song # 1 on the LOVE WILL COME album). He occasionally played the song Peppermint Patty as a waltz, as he did near the beginning of the episode YOU’RE A GOOD SPORT, CHARLIE BROWN. Some other noted jazz waltzes are: Bobby Timmons’ This Here, Toots Thielemans’ Bluesette, Bill Evans’ Waltz for Debbie, Miles Davis’ All Blues, and Thomas “Fats” Waller’s Jitterbug Waltz (that Vince Guaraldi also recorded on his album VINCE GUARALDI–IN PERSON), and there are many more great ones.



Some other noted jazz waltzes are: Bobby Timmons’ This Here and Soul Time, Toots Thielemans’ Bluesette, Miles Davis’ All Blues, Bill Evans’ Waltz for Debby and B Minor Waltz (for Ellaine) and G Waltz and Carnival and Maxine and Tiffany and Very Early and We Will Meet Again and Waltz in Eb and The Two Lonely People and A Simple Matter of Conviction, Miles Davis’ and Bill Evans’ arrangements of the Larry Morey & Frank Churchill song Someday My Prince Will Come, Bill Evans’ arrangement of the Sammy Fain & Bob Hilliard song Alice in Wonderland, Tad Jones’ A Child is Born, Dave Brubeck’s It’s a Raggy Waltz and Kathy’s Waltz and Three to Get Ready and Theme From Mr. Broadway, John Coltrane’s Spiritual and Ole as well as his arrangements of Greensleeves and the Rogers & Hammerstein songs My Favorite Things and Chim Chim Cheree, Jimmy Smith’s variation on the John Coltrane arrangement of Greensleeves, the Oliver Nelson/Jimmy Smith arrangement of Richard Rodgers’ Slaughter on Tenth Avenue, the Oliver Nelson/ Jimmy Smith arrangement of Elmer Bernstein’s Walk on the Wild Side, Oliver Nelson’s Six and Four, and part of his Blues and the Abstract Truth, part of Jimmy Smith’s Oh No Babe, part of Jimmy Smith’s arrangement of Johnny Mercer’s Blues in the Night, Jimmy Smith’s arrangement of the Roy Jacob, Will Welden & Andy Razaf song I’m Gonna Move to the Outskirts of Town, Charles Mingus Better Git It In Your Soul, McCoy Tyner’s Groove Waltz and Three Flowers, Rahsaan Roland Kirk’s The Waltz of the Friends, Burt Bacharach’s Wives and Lovers and What The World Needs Now is Love, Horace Silver’s Mary Lou and Serenade to a Soul Sister and Pretty Eyes and My Mother's Waltz, and Senor Blues (which could also be interpreted as in 4/4 time)and Whenever Lester Plays the Blues and Summer in Central Park and Nothin’ Can Stop Me Now, Don Newey’s Without You, Milt Jackson’s Some Kinda Waltz and Soul in 3/4, Milt Jackson’s arrangement of his song Bags’ Groove in 3/4 time with Ray Brown and J. J. Johnson, Jimmy Heath’s Gemini, Wes Montgomery’s West Coast Blues, Cal Tjader’s Colorado Waltz and Fuji, Cal Tjader & Eddie Palmieri’s Unidos, Vic Ash’s The Hooter, Cedar Walton’s Midnight Waltz, Wayne Shorter’s Footprints and Isis, Thelonious Monk’s Ugly Beauty, Sonny Rollins’ Valse Hot and Kids Know, Joe Zawinul’s Midnight Mood, Max Roach’s Blues Waltz and Little Folks and The Drum Also Waltzes, Art Blakey’s arrangement of Lift Every Voice and Sing (The Black National Anthem) [composed in 1900 by James Weldon Johnson & J, Rosamond Johnson], Gerald Wilson’s Blues for Yna Yna, Erroll Garner’s Paris Mist (Waltz-Swing) and Fashion Interlude, Hugh Martin and Ralph Blane’s The Boy Next Door, Larry Young's Testifying and The Hereafter and Tyrone and Falaq and Sunshine Fly Away, Art Pepper’s & Paul Chambers’ Waltz Me Blues, Richie Bierach’s Nightlake, Gary Peacock’s The Pond, Gary Peacock’s & Marc Copland’s arrangement of Stanley Myers’ song Cavatine, Dale Bruning’s Dancing With Daffodils, Cannonball Adderely’s version of Galt MacDermot’s African Waltz, Earl Zindar’s Elsa, Jaco Pastorius’ Three Views of a Secret, Randy Weston’s Waltz for Sweet Cakes, Donald Brown’s Waltz for Monk, John Patton’s Just 3/4, Antonio Carlos Jobim’s Chovendo Na Roseira (Double Rainbow), Herbie Nichols’ Love Gloom Cash Love, Freddie Hubbard’s Up Jumped Spring, Don Friedman’s Circle Waltz, Frank Rosolino’s Blue Daniel, Denny Zeitlin’s I-Thou and Carole’s Waltz and Waltz for Josephine, Hampton Hawes’ Sonoro and Rhonda as well as his arrangements of The Green Leaves of Summer and Fly Me to the Moon (which Bart Howard originally composed in 3/4 time, even though it is usually played in 4/4 time, including a version [in 4/4 time] by Vince Guaraldi which was issued as a bonus track on his recording JAZZ IMPRESSIONS OF A BOY NAMES CHARLIE BROWN), Ron Carter’s Little Waltz, Marian McPartland’s Melancholy Mood and Threnody, Leonard Bernstein’s I Feel Pretty, David “Fathead” Newman’s Song for the New Man, Mal Waldron’s Fire Waltz, Booker Little’s Booker’s Waltz, Henry Butler’s Joanna, Henry Mancini & Johnny Mercer’s Moon River, Oscar Peterson’s Lady Di’s Waltz, Chick Corea’s Windows, Joe Henderson’s Black Narcissus, John Abercrombie’s Ralph’s Piano Waltz, The Bob Thiele Collective’s (with David Murray, John Hicks, Cecil McBee, & Andrew Cyrille) arrangement of Richard Rodgers’ Sunrise Sunset, Steve Allen & Ray Brown’s Gravy Waltz, Jerome Kern’s Up With the Lark, Gary McFarland’s Peachtree, Marc Cary’s Waltz Betty Waltz, Dave Lewis' Little Green Thing, Bill Engvick & Morty Palitz & Alec Wilder’s While We’re Young, Walter Gross’ Tenderly, Elmore James’ Twelve Year Old Boy, John Hicks’ Waltz for Ruth, Ron Jackson’s Nikki’s Waltz, Phil DeGreg’s Carol’s Waltz, Lennie Niehaus’ Waltz for Spring, Duane Andrew’s Portuguese Waltz, Jesse Green’s My Miracle, Mel Torme’s arrangement of Bobby Timmons’ Moanin’, Eubie Blake’s Marion’s Waltz, and Margaret’s Waltz, Kenny Wheeler’s Heyoke, Jacam Manricks’ Cloud 9 (also could say this song is in 9/8 time), Spirit’s Elijah and Fresh-Garbage(the modal improvisation in the electric piano solo –[the rest of the song is in 4/4/time])and Space Child, Darol Anger’s Keep Sleeping, Bruce Cockburn’s Rise and Fall and Sun Salt and Time, Alex Degrassi’s Turning and Turning Back and Causeway, and Thomas “Fats” Waller’s Jitterbug Waltz (that Vince Guaraldi also recorded on his album VINCE GUARALDI–IN PERSON).

5. Monterey 4:33

This impressionistic portrait of one of California’s most beautiful coastal areas was originally recorded for the album VINCE GUARALDI WITH THE SAN FRANCISCO BOYS CHOIR in 1968. It was self-produced by Vince on his own D&D label (which was named for the first initials of his two children), formed when he was in between Fantasy Records and Warner Brothers Records. It has been reissued on the Guaraldi Family label - www.vinceguaraldi.com.

This song is in G minor and it uses a variation of Vince’s trademark descending chord progression (see The Great Pumpkin Waltz, song #4 above, in the second paragraph). I use a slow stride bass with tenth intervals, which I learned from Fats Waller (1904-1943) [www.redhotjazz.com/fats.html & www.georgewinston.com/faqs.html#fats] and Teddy Wilson (1912-1986) [www.georgewinston.com/faqs.html#teddy].The introduction here in the key of F comes from an intro that Vince played for the song What Kind of Fool Am I, which is from the CD is THE NAVY SWINGS radio show (D&D Records), with Vince’s trio performing with guitarist Bola Sete.

Vince also composed another song about the Monterey Bay area, Pebble Beach, on his album (JAZZ IMPRESSIONS OF) A BOY NAMED CHARLIE BROWN (Fantasy Records).

6. A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving 2:29

This is the theme song from the November 1973 episode of the same name. In the key of C, the bridge features a G13th chord with right hand phrases evocative of an early snowfall. Vince’s version has been issued (with the title Thanksgiving Theme) on the album CHARLIE BROWN’S HOLIDAY HITS, and also on the album VINCE GUARALDI AND THE LOST CUES FROM THE CHARLIE BROWN TELEVISION SPECIALS VOLUME 1, the latter album issued on the Guaraldi Family D&D label - www.vinceguaraldi.com.

7. Treat Street 4:51

This song was released as the follow-up single to Cast Your Fate to the Wind and appeared on the 1964 album THE LATIN SIDE OF VINCE GUARALDI. The title refers to the street in the Mission District in San Francisco where the Fantasy studio was originally located.

Treat Street is in the key of C, and I use James Booker’s full left hand style, with the top note of an octave and the fifth note just below it played together simultaneously just before the beat, and then the lower note of the octave played right on the next beat - rather than using Vince’s left hand broken octave technique, with the top note of the octave (without the fifth), played just before the beat, and then the lower note of the octave played right on the next beat.


8. Eight Five Five 1:22

This short cue, called "Kite Animation Theme", appeared in the documentary special CHARLIE BROWN AND CHARLES SCHULZ from 1969. Composed by Vince in the key of C, this slightly expanded version is played in the keys of C and F, and uses a slow stride piano technique that I again learned from James Booker, with a high tenth note and the fifth note just below it played simultaneously just before the beat, and then the lower root note of the chord played on the beat.

Several of the pieces Vince composed for the Peanuts® specials never appeared on any of his albums. So far this is the only time that this Vince Guaraldi piece has been recorded on an album, along with the songs Bon Voyage (song #13) and Young Man’s Fancy (song #14).

9. The Masked Marvel 5:36

One of Snoopy’s many personas, The Masked Marvel was featured in the September 1969 episode IT WAS A SHORT SUMMER, CHARLIE BROWN. To score Snoopy’s adventures, Vince made use of a haunting Latin-type minor chord progression of G minor 7, C7, F minor 7, and Bb7, using variations of his trademark broken octaves in the bass lines in the left hand, with the higher note played just before the beat and then the lower note played right on the beat. He also recorded this song for his 1974 album ALMA-VILLE, which was his third album for Warner Brothers and it was also the last album he recorded in his lifetime. This song is in the key of F minor and I again use the James Booker full left hand style from the third verse onward (see the notes for Treat Street, song #7 above). James Booker’s influence is especially evident at the end of the second bridge with the repeated chord progression of F minor to C7, and with the right hand fills..

10. Charlie Brown’s All-Stars 1:54

This buoyant melody in the key of Ab expresses the irrepressible optimism in the Charlie Brown character. It was written for the June 1966 episode of the same name that centered around the Peanuts® gang’s unsuccessful attempts to win a baseball game. “Baseball lent itself well to animation,” Lee Mendelson remembers. “I had just done a documentary on Willie Mays, the world’s greatest baseball player, and wanted to do something on Charlie Brown, the world’s worst baseball player.” This theme was also prominently featured in the February 1968 episode HE’S YOUR DOG, CHARLIE BROWN, as well as some in the June 1967 episode YOU’RE IN LOVE, CHARLIE BROWN, and in the 1970 feature film and soundtrack album A BOY NAMED CHARLIE BROWN. The main melody of this song features a I to flat VII chord progression, here Ab Major to Gb Major, that was one of Vince’s favorites (as well as being one of guitarist Bola Sete’s favorites), and he also used it in his Peanuts pieces The Red Baron(song #17), and Bus Blues, and in other compositions such as El Matador. This song also uses Vince’s trademark descending chord progression (see The Great Pumpkin Waltz, song #4 above, in the second paragraph).

11. You’re in Love, Charlie Brown 2:47

Much of Peanuts® is about unrequited love, and Vince’s style was perfect for it. This lilting theme in 3/4 time, in the key of Ab, first appeared in the June 1967 episode of the same name. It was also prominently used with beautiful variations in the September 1969 episode IT WAS A SHORT SUMMER, CHARLIE BROWN. He also recorded it for his 1968 album OH, GOOD GRIEF!. This song also uses Vince’s trademark descending chord progression (see The Great Pumpkin Waltz, song #4 above, in the second paragraph). When I now play this piece I also use part of Bobby Timmons’ song This Here in the middle of the song.

12. Peppermint Patty 3:40

Charles Schulz remained a popular cartoonist because of his remarkable ability to create characters with staying power, and for his ability to introduce new characters that allowed him to explore a wider set of issues. In the late 1960s he brought in Peppermint Patty, and this is the theme Vince wrote for her. It first appeared in the June 1967 episode YOU’RE IN LOVE, CHARLIE BROWN, and it also appeared in HE’S YOUR DOG CHARLIE BROWN, IT WAS A SHORT SUMMER CHARLIE BROWN, PLAY IT AGAIN CHARLIE BROWN, THERE’S NO TIME FOR LOVE CHARLIE BROWN, A CHARLIE BROWN THANKSGIVING, IT’S THE EASTER BEAGLE CHARLIE BROWN, and IT’S ARBOR DAY CHARLIE BROWN. This song reflects some of the rock influence that Vince absorbed in the late 1960s, especially in the end progression with the Ab, B, F#, and G Major chords. Vince played this in the key of F, and I play it here in the key of Ab, again using the James Booker full left hand (see the notes for Treat Street, song #7 above). Vince used this piece in several other episodes, and he also recorded it for his 1968 album OH, GOOD GRIEF!. A live version from 1968 with an orchestra has been issued on an album produced by Vince’s son David, THE CHARLIE BROWN SUITE & OTHER FAVORITES. Two other versions appear on the albums VINCE GUARALDI WITH THE SAN FRANCISCO BOYS CHOIR, and VINCE GUARALDI AND THE LOST CUES FROM THE CHARLIE BROWN TELEVISION SPECIALS VOLUME 1, both issued on the Guaraldi Family D&D label - www.vinceguaraldi.com. This song also uses Vince’s trademark descending chord progression (see The Great Pumpkin Waltz, song #4 above, in the second paragraph).

13. Bon Voyage 1:46

This short piece in the key of D minor first appeared in the February 1968 episode HE’S YOUR DOG, CHARLIE BROWN, as Snoopy is leaving home. It also appears in IT WAS A SHORT SUMMER CHARLIE BROWN CHARLIE BROWN This song uses minor key variations on Vince’s trademark descending chord progression (see The Great Pumpkin Waltz, song #4 above, in the second paragraph). So far this is the only time that this Vince Guaraldi piece has been recorded on an album, along with the songs Eight Five Five (song #8) and Young Man’s Fancy (song #14).

14. Young Man’s Fancy 3:52

This melodic ballad in the key of F appeared throughout the fifteenth and last television episode that Vince scored, IT’S ARBOR DAY, CHARLIE BROWN. It aired in March 1976, just after he passed away. So far this is the only time that this Vince Guaraldi song has been recorded on an album, along with the songs Eight Five Five (song #8) and Bon Voyage (song #13).

15. Remembrance 2:20

Vince composed this beautiful melodic solo piano piece, also known as In Remembrance of Me, as part of a commission to celebrate the completion of Grace Cathedral in San Francisco. The project, which resulted in the world’s first jazz mass, was performed and recorded on May 21, 1965. The inspired blending of Gregorian chants, the choir, jazz improvisation with Vince’s trio, and occasionally the pipe organ, can be heard on the live album VINCE GUARALDI AT GRACE CATHEDRAL (reissued on CD as THE GRACE CATHEDRAL CONCERT).

One of the few solo piano pieces recorded by Vince, Remembrance starts in the key of C minor and modulates to the key of F for the second half of the song. It features two distinct sections and it captures the essence of San Francisco’s cloudy winter days. The second half also uses Vince’s trademark descending chord progression (see The Great Pumpkin Waltz, song #4 above, in the second paragraph). Vince was very inspired by the late great jazz pianist Bill Evans (1929-1980), from pieces such as the Bill Evans/ Miles Davis composition Blue in Green, from the classic and very influential Miles Davis 1959 album KIND OF BLUE.

Vince did record three other beautiful solo piano pieces: the standards Never Never Land (from his album THE VINCE GUARALDI TRIO), as well as Autumn Leaves and Yesterdays (both issued on two of his albums, THE JAZZ IMPRESSIONS and A FLOWER IS A LOVESOME THING). He also played beautiful extended solo piano introductions to three pieces: his composition Theme to Grace (song #16), and for the standards Fly Me to the Moon (issued as a bonus track on his album JAZZ IMPRESSIONS OF A BOY NAMED CHARLIE BROWN) and The Christmas Song (aka Chestnuts Roasting on an Open Fire) from his album A CHARLIE BROWN CHRISTMAS.

16. Theme to Grace/Lament 4:57

A lyrical melody also from Vince’s 1965 jazz mass, from the live album VINCE GUARALDI AT GRACE CATHEDRAL (reissued on CD as THE GRACE CATHEDRAL CONCERT). Theme to Grace is in the keys of D minor and F, and I put together the middle section, Lament, as a tribute to Vince. He also recorded this piece on his 1968 album VINCE GUARALDI WITH THE SAN FRANCISCO BOYS CHOIR on the Guaraldi Family D&D label - www.vinceguaraldi.com.


Liner notes by George Winston and Jay Junker
Produced by George Winston, Howard Johnston and Cathy Econom
Recorded by Howard Johnston
Additional Engineering by Maurice Ricks, Nancy Scharlau, Mark Slagle and Adam Muñoz
Mastered by Bernie Grundman at Bernie Grundman Mastering, Hollywood, CA
Art direction by Candace Upman
Photography ©Morton Beebe 1996 San Francisco
Treat Street photography by Lynn Davis


Special thanks to: David Guaraldi & everyone in the Guaraldi Family, Lee Mendelson, Glenn Mendelson & everyone at Lee Mendelson Film Productions, the late Charles Schulz & Family, Derrick & Gayna Bang, the late Ralph J. Gleason, Toby Gleason, Jean Gleason, Andy Thomas, the late Bola Sete, Ann Sete, Eddie Duran, Sharman Duran, Dean Reilly, Chris Orrall, Lokelani, Pua Lilia, the late James Booker, Henry Butler, the late Teddy Wilson, Thomas “Fats” Waller, the late Professor Longhair (Henry Roeland Byrd), Bill Belmont & Jeffrey Wood & everyone at Fantasy Records, everyone at Warner Brothers Records, everyone at Warner Home Video, Jeff Maynard & everyone at Amity Pictures, Alexander Gray & everyone at Studio West Pictures John Pfeifer, Bob Doerschuk, Gary Stiffelman, and everyone at Dancing Cat Productions and Sony.


WEBSITES ON VINCE GUARALDI:

  1. www.anatomyofvinceguaraldi.com - The official site of the documentary film THE ANATOMY OF VINCE GUARALDI, produced in 2009 and 2010 by filmmakers Andrew Thomas and Toby Gleason. This is the new updated version with bonus footage of the film ANATOMY OF A HIT, a three-part film about Vince’s song Cast Your Fate to the Wind, produced by Toby’s father Ralph J. Gleason for PBS TV in 1963. The beginning of the film is based on ANATOMY OF A HIT, and then Vince's story moves forward through his years at the hungry i, to his Jazz Mass at Grace Cathedral, and his scores for the Peanuts animated programs. This feature-length film blends newly discovered recordings and film with the on-screen insights of Dave Brubeck, Dick Gregory, Jon Hendricks, as well as George Winston, and others, making it an essential resource for anyone with an interest in Vince Guaraldi.

  2. www.vinceguaraldi.com- The official Vince Guaraldi family site - the Guaraldi family is constantly issuing new recordings on the family label, D&D Records.

  3. www.schulzmuseum.org- Site for the Charles Schulz Museum.

  4. www.snoopy.com- United Media's official Peanuts site.

DERRICK BANG'S SITES:

  1. Derrick Bang has written a wonderful deeply informative book: VINCE GUARALDI AT THE PIANO. He has also written several books on Peanuts creator Charles Schulz. For updates to the book see http://fivecentsplease.org/dpb/VinceGuaralditimeline.html . In Derrick’s words, “This document is a detailed companion to my published career study,Vince Guaraldi at the Piano. Even at close to 400 pages, the book wasn't long enough to permit the inclusion of every significant event, performance or recording date during Vince Guaraldi's quite busy lifetime. Additionally, a project of this nature never really ‘concludes,’ because new information always comes to light; this document will serve as the perfect home for such fresh material. Any visitors with additional information -- names with which to replace the ‘unspecified’ tags, or gigs that aren't even listed here - are asked to contact me at derrick@fivecentsplease.org , so this timeline can be updated.”

  2. http://fivecentsplease.org/dpb/guaraldi.html- Derrick Bang’s great site with many sections on Vince Guaraldi, including a complete discography

  3. http://fivecentsplease.org/dpb/cuesheet.html-- Itemized list of all Vince Guaraldi compositions in the Peanuts TV specials on Derrick Bang’s site.

  4. http://fivecentsplease.org/dpb/ - Derrick Bang’s primary site on Peanuts, Charles Schulz, and Vince Guaraldi

Also pianist Bob Deorchuck wrote a great article on Vince Guaraldi for the July 1981 edition of KEYBOARD Magazine www.keyboardmag.com. To download a PDF of the original article, click here. To order this back issue (if available) call 1-800-444-4881 or 785-838-7500, or email orders@cmp.com


VINCE GUARALDI DISCOGRAPHY:

(these are in print unless otherwise noted - and the year the album was recorded is listed at the end of each selection):

AS A LEADER:

  1. A CHARLIE BROWN CHRISTMAS ((Fantasy FCD-30066-2) – new edition released in 2006 with five bonus tracks – originally released in 1965 – this issue has different version of some of the songs from the previous CD issues (I suggest getting an older one as well as the newer one with the five bonus tracks) - also see www.peanutscollectorclub.com/cbxmas.html
  2. (JAZZ IMPRESSIONS OF) A BOY NAMED CHARLIE BROWN (Fantasy 8430-2) - 1964
  3. OH, GOOD GRIEF! (Warner Bros. Records WS 1747) - 1968
  4. THE CHARLIE BROWN SUITE & OTHER FAVORITES (Bluebird RCA 53900)
  5. THE CHARLIE BROWN SUITE & OTHER FAVORITES (Bluebird RCA 82876-53900) – live concert with an orchestra from May 18, 1968, along with three studio tracks from the 1960s – (on this album the track Happiness Is is actually the song The Great Pumpkin Waltz).
  6. CHARLIE BROWN’S HOLIDAY HITS (Fantasy 9682-2) – tracks from the 1960s and 1970’s
  7. VINCE GUARALDI AND THE LOST CUES FROM THE CHARLIE BROWN TV SPECIALS (D&D Records VG 1118 - 2006
  8. VINCE GUARALDI AND THE LOST CUES FROM THE CHARLIE BROWN TV SPECIALS – VOLUME 2 (D&D Records VG 1119) - 2008
  9. THE GRACE CATHEDRAL CONCERT [aka VINCE GUARALDI AT GRACE CATHEDRAL] (Fantasy FCD-9678-2) - 1966
  10. JAZZ IMPRESSIONS OF BLACK ORPHEUS (Original Jazz Classics OJC-437-2) – has the original version of Cast Your Fate to the Wind - 1962
  11. NORTH BEACH (D&D Records VG 4465) – tracks from the 1960s
  12. OAXACA (D&D Records VG 1125) – tracks from the late 1960s and early 1970s
  13. VINCE GUARALDI TRIO – LIVE ON THE AIR (D&D Records VG1120 – live tracks from 1974
  14. AN AFTERNOON WITH THE VINCE GUARALDI QUARTET – (VAG Publishing LCC - VAG 1121) – live tracks from 1967
  15. VINCE GUARALDI WITH THE SAN FRANCISCO BOYS CHORUS (D&D VG 1116) – 1968
  16. ALMA-VILLE (Wounded Bird Records WOU-1828 [formally on Warner Brothers Records]) - 1970
  17. THE ECLECTIC VINCE GUARALDI (Wounded Bird Records WOU-1775 [formally on Warner Brothers Records) -1969
  18. A BOY NAMED CHARLIE BROWN [film soundtrack] (Columbia Masterworks OS3500, LP only - out of print) – edited version of the film with the dialogue and music (there is much more dialogue and much more of Vince’s music in the film)- 1969
  19. THE LATIN SIDE OF VINCE GUARALDI (Fantasy Original Jazz Classics OJCCD-878-2) - 1964
  20. JAZZ IMPRESSIONS (Fantasy Original Jazz Classics OJCCD-287-2) - 1957
  21. A FLOWER IS A LOVESOME THING (Fantasy Original Jazz Classics OJC-235-2) - contains five tracks from the album JAZZ IMPRESSIONS, along with three other tracks - 1957
  22. IN PERSON (Fantasy Original Jazz Classical OJCCD-951-2) - 1963
  23. VINCE GUARALDI TRIO (Fantasy Original Jazz Classics OJCCD-149-2) – 1956
  24. JAZZ SCENE: SAN FRANCISCO (MODERN MUSIC FROM SAN FRANCISCO) (Fantasy Original Jazz Classics 272 – the LP is out of print, and the 1991 reissued CD titled THE JAZZ SCENE SAN FRANCISCO on Fantasy 24760 is also out of print) - has two tracks by The Vince Guaraldi Quartet, as well as three tracks with Vince playing with the Ron Crotty Trio - 1955
  25. VINCE GUARALDI’S GREATEST HITS (Fantasy 7706-2) - 1980
  26. THE DEFINITIVE VINCE GUARALDI (Fantasy Records FAN 31462) – 2 CD set of tracks from his Fantasy Label recordings from 1955 through 1965, including two previously unissued bonus tracks, Autumn Leaves, and Blues for Peanuts.
  27. ESSENTIAL STANDARDS - (concord OJC31426 02) – compilation of songs from eight albums – 2009
  28. PEANUTS PORTRAITS (Fantasy Records FAN-31462) – Full versions of ten songs from the Peanuts soundtracks (they are usually much shorter in the episodes, to match the action), as well as unissued versions of Frieda (with the Naturally Curly Hair), Schroeder, Blue Charlie Brown, Charlie’s Blues, and Sally’s Blues, and Vince’s great vocal on Little Birdie. - 2010
  29. a Vince Guaraldi box set may be available in the future

VINCE GUARALDI WITH BOLA SETE:

  1. VINCE GUARALDI, BOLA SETE & FRIENDS (Fantasy 8356) – with guitarist Bola Sete - 1963
  2. LIVE AT EL MATADOR (Original Jazz Classics OJC-289) – with guitarist Bola Sete – 1966 - these two albums, VINCE GUARALDI, BOLA SETE & FRIENDS and LIVE AT EL MATADOR have been reissued together on one CD as VINCE GUARALDI AND BOLA SETE (Fantasy FCD-24256-2)
  3. FROM ALL SIDES (Original Jazz Classics OJC 989) - with guitarist Bola Sete - 1965
  4. VINCE GUARALDI & BOLA SETE - THE NAVY SWINGS (VAG Publishing LCC – live radio broadcasts of Vince’s trio with guitarist Bola Sete - 1965
  5. JAZZ CASUAL: PAUL WINTER/ BOLA SETE & VINCE GUARALDI (Koch Jazz KOC CD-8566) – Vince’s trio with guitarist Bola Sete (the Paul Winter set, without Vince, is a separate performance) - this performance by Vince and Bola is also on DVD: JAZZ CASUAL: ART PEPPER/ VINCE GUARALDI & BOLA SETE (the Art Pepper set, without Vince, is a separate performance) - produced by Ralph J. Gleason for PBS TV in the mid 1960s – (the DVD issue of the original Rhino Home Video VHS release is out of print but is sometimes available used at Amazon.com – if ordering for North American DVD players, be sure to order the NTSC version) – 1963

THE SIXTEEN PEANUTS ANIMATIONS SCORED BY VINCE GUARALDI (all are available on VHS at www.amazon.com; and some are available on DVD, with more becoming available later)

  1. A Charlie Brown Christmas (December 1965) - EXCEPTIONAL SCORE – available on DVD - PEANUTS HOLIDAY COLLECTION, along with episodes #3 & #11
  2. Charlie Brown and His All-Stars (June 1966)- EXCEPTIONAL SCORE –
  3. It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown (October 1966) - EXCEPTIONAL SCORE – available on DVD - PEANUTS HOLIDAY COLLECTION, along with episodes #1 & #11
  4. You’re in Love, Charlie Brown (June 1967)
  5. He’s Your Dog, Charlie Brown (February 1968)
  6. It Was a Short Summer, Charlie Brown (September 1969) - EXCEPTIONAL SCORE
  7. A Boy Named Charlie Brown (1970) - (one hour feature film)
  8. Play It Again, Charlie Brown (March 1971)
  9. You’re Not Elected, Charlie Brown (October 1972) - EXCEPTIONAL SCORE
  10. There’s No Time for Love, Charlie Brown (March 1973)
  11. A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving (November 1973) - EXCEPTIONAL SCORE – available on DVD - PEANUTS HOLIDAY COLLECTION, along with episodes #1 & #3
  12. It’s a Mystery, Charlie Brown (February 1974)
  13. It’s the Easter Beagle, Charlie Brown (April 1974)
  14. Be My Valentine, Charlie Brown (January 1975)- EXCEPTIONAL SCORE
  15. You’re a Good Sport, Charlie Brown (October 1975)
  16. It’s Arbor Day, Charlie Brown (March 1976)

Some additional television specials with Vince Guaraldi’s music:

  1. There was a television documentary that aired in 1969 called Charlie Brown and Charles Schulz with music by Vince Guaraldi (available on DVD from the Charles Schulz Museum www.schulzmuseum.org).
  2. There was also an unaired television special from 1963 called A Boy Named Charlie Brown (unreleased on video) with music by Vince Guaraldi, some of which wound up being released along with other Vince Guaraldi compositions on his album (JAZZ IMPRESSIONS OF) A BOY NAMED CHARLIE BROWN. Some of this footage also ended up in the 1969 documentary Charlie Brown and Charles Schulz, and in the 1976 documentary Happy Anniversary Charlie Brown
  3. Also in 1976 there was a television special Happy Anniversary Charlie Brown with some music by Vince Guaraldi (unreleased on video).

    Also see www.peanutscollectorclub.com/cuesheet.html for an itemized list in Derrick Bang’s site of all the Vince Guaraldi compositions in the sixteen Peanuts® animations and the television documentary that he scored.

VINCE GUARALDI AS A SIDEMAN (in print unless otherwise noted):

WITH CAL TJADER:

  1. EXTREMES (Fantasy FCS-24764-2) – reissue contains two albums: THE CAL TJADER TRIO, recorded with Vince Guaraldi in 1951; and the album BREATHE EASY (without Vince) - 1951
  2. CAL TJADER: OUR BLUES (Fantasy FCD-24771-2) – reissue contains two albums: CAL TJADER, recorded with Vince in 1957; and CONCERT ON THE CAMPUS ( without Vince) – 1957
  3. JAZZ AT THE BLACKHAWK (Original Jazz Classics OJCCD-436-2) – 1957
  4. BLACK ORCHID (Fantasy FCD-24730-2) - contains two albums: CAL TJADER GOES LATIN, recorded with Vince in 1957; and CAL TJADER QUINTET (without Vince) - 1957
  5. SESSIONS LIVE: CAL TJADER AND CHICO HAMILTON (Calliope CAL 3011 - LP only, and out of print) - Vince plays on four songs with Cal Tjader: Lover Come Back to Me, The Night We Called It a Day, Bernie’s Tune, and Jammin’ – 1957
  6. LOS RITMOS CALIENTES (Fantasy FCD 24712-2) –reissue contains two albums: MAS RITMO CALIENTES, RECORDED WITH Vince in 1957; and RITMO CALIENTE (without Vince) - 1957
  7. SENTIMENTAL MOODS (Fantasy FCD-24742-2)– reissue contains two albums: LATIN FOR LOVERS, recorded with Vince in 1958; and SAN FRANCISCO MOODS, which includes only one track with Vince, recorded in 1958 - 1958
  8. A NIGHT AT THE BLACKHAWK [reissue of the album BLACKHAWK NIGHTS] (Fantasy OJCCD-2475-5) – 1958
  9. CAL TJADER’S LATIN CONCERT [reissue of the album LATIN CONCERT] (Fantasy Original Jazz Classics OJCCD-643-2) – 1958
  10. SESSIONS LIVE: CAL TJADER, CHRIS CONNOR AND PAUL TOGIWA (Calliope CAL 3002 - LP only, and out of print) – Vince plays on three songs: Crow’s Nest, Liz-Anne(aka Leazon), and Tumbao - 1958
  11. CAL TJADER/ STAN GETZ QUARTET (aka THE STAN GETZ/ CAL TJADER QUARTET) [reissue of the album STAN GETZ WITH CAL TJADER] (Fantasy Original Jazz Classics OJCCD-275) – 1958
  12. BEST OF CAL TJADER: LIVE AT THE MONTEREY JAZZ FESTIVAL 1958-1980 (Concord/ Monterey Jazz Festival Records MJFR-30701 ) - Vince plays on the first four tracks from the legendary performance from 1958: especially on Summertime and Now’s the Time; and also Cubano Chant, and Tambao – 1958

WITH WOODY HERMAN:

  1. WOODY HERMAN AND HIS ORCHESTRA: 1956 Storyville Records [Denmark] STCD 8247/48 – Double CD set with 41 songs with Vince Guaraldi as part of the Woody Herman Big Band, recorded July 28-29, 1956 – Here Vince piano wasn't recorded very well, so you need to boost the volume to best hear his introductions and his playing (and turn it down when the other instruments kick back in). He can be heard at the beginning of These Foolish Things, Buttercup, After Theater Jump, and Pimlico. Vince plays some short solos midway through Autobahn Blues and Square Circle, and he plays a bit more during Woodchopper's Ball. Vince’s best playing on these CDs is on five other tracks: Opus De Funk, which starts with his great boogie-woogie solo that runs for about a minute; Country Cousin, where he plays a brief intro and then a long solo halfway through the song; Wild Root, which has a great Vince solo; and best of all on Pinetop's Blues, with Vince's great boogie-woogie work behind Woody's vocal.
  2. THE COMPLETE CAPITAL RECORDINGS OF WOODY HERMAN 1944-56 (Mosaic MD6-196) - 6 CD SET including all the tracks from the BLUES GROOVE album. Disk 5 has three tracks that feature Vince Guaraldi: 5-10-15 Hours, You Took Advantage of Me, and Wonderful One.
  3. BLUES GROOVE (Capital T784, LP only - out of print) – with Woody Herman – 1956
  4. WOODY HERMAN’S ANGLO-AMERICAN HERD (Jazz Groove #004 - LP only, and out of print) - recorded live in Manchester, England, in April 1959 - 1959

WITH OTHERS:

  1. GUS MANCUSO & SPECIAL FRIENDS (Fantasy FCD-24762-2) – contains two albums: INTRODUCING GUS MANCUSO, recorded in 1956 with Vince; and GUS MANCUSO QUINTET (without Vince) – 1956
  2. WEST COAST JAZZ IN HIFI (Fantasy OJCCD-1760-2) [originally issued with the title JAZZ EROTICA {Hi Fi Jazz –R-604}] – with Richie Kamuca & Bill Holman - 1957
  3. THE FRANK ROSOLINO QUINTET (VSOP #16-CD – reissue of the album called VINCE GUARALDI/ FRANK ROSOLINO QUINTET on Premier Records PS 2014, and also issued on Mode Records MOD-LP-107; reissued on CD in Japan on the Muzak, Inc. Label MZCS-1166 – and four tracks from this album also appear on the album NINA SIMONE LIVE –WITH SPECIAL GUEST VINCE GUARALDI (Coronet CXS 242 – LP only) Vince appears on 4 tracks with the Frank Rosolino Quintet, and these are entirely separate from the Nina Simone tracks) - with Frank Rosolino – 1957
  4. LITTLE BAND, BIG JAZZ (Fresh Sound Records FSR1629) – [aka VINCE GUARALDI AND THE CONTE CANDOLI ALL STARS] (Crown Records CST417 & CLP5417) – with Conte Candoli – 1960
  5. CONTE CANDOLI QUARTET (Music Visions TFCL-88915 [Japan issue] – reissue of the album THE VINCE GUARALDI/CONTE CANDOLI QUARTET on Premier Records PM 2009, and also issued on Mode Records MOD-LP-109; reissued on CD in Japan on the Muzak, Inc. Label MZCS-1167) – 1957
  6. MONGO (Prestiege PRCD 24018-2 – reissue has the albums MONGO and YAMBU) – with Mongo Santamaria – Vince plays on one song from the MANGO album, Mazacote - 1958
  7. LATINSVILLE! (Contemporary CCD-9005-2) – with Victor Feldman - 1959
  8. BREW MOORE QUINTET (Fantasy OJCCD-100-2 [F-3-222]) – with Brew Moore – Vince plays on one song, Fools Rush In - 1955
  9. BREW MOORE (Fantasy LP3-265 & Original Jazz Classics OJC 049 - on LP and out of print) – Vince plays on one song, Dues’ Blues -1955
  10. JIMMY WITHERSPOON AND BEN WEBSTER (Verve V6-8835) - Vince Guaraldi backs up Jimmy Witherspoon and Ben Webster - 1959
  11. LIVE ... JIMMY WITHERSPOON, FEATURING THE BEN WEBSTER QUARTET (EMI/ Stateside SSL 10232 - Vince Guaraldi backs up Jimmy Witherspoon and Ben Webster - 1961
  12. JAZZ CASUAL: JIMMY WITHERSPOON AND BEN WEBSTER/ JIMMY RUSHING – produced by Ralph J. Gleason for PBS TV in 1962 – (the DVD issue of the original Rhino Home Video VHS release is out of print but is sometimes available used at Amazon.com - if ordering for North American DVD players, be sure to order the NTSC version) - also available on CD on Koch Jazz KOC CD-8561 – Vince Guaraldi here backs up Jimmy Witherspoon and Ben Webster (the Jimmy Rushing set, without Vince, is a separate performance) – 1962

VINCE GUARALDI VIDEOS:

  1. THE ANATOMY OF VINCE GUARALDI – reissued produced for DVD by Andrew Thomas and Toby Gleason with bonus footage – this is the new updated version of the film ANATOMY OF A HIT, a three-part film about Vince’s song Cast Your Fate to the Wind, produced by Toby’s father Ralph J. Gleason for PBS TV in 1963.
  2. JAZZ CASUAL: ART PEPPER/ VINCE GUARALDI & BOLA SETE (the Art Pepper set, without Vince, is a separate performance) - produced by Ralph J. Gleason for PBS TV in 1963 – (the DVD issue of the original Rhino Home Video VHS release is out of print but is sometimes available used at Amazon.com – if ordering for North American DVD players, be sure to order the NTSC version) – also available on CD with the title JAZZ CASUAL: PAUL WINTER/ BOLA SETE & VINCE GUARALDI (the Paul Winter set, without Vince, is a separate performance) on Koch Jazz KOC CD-8566 – Vince here plays with his trio with guitarist Bola Sete, and Bola Sete also appears without Vince -1993
  3. JAZZ CASUAL: JIMMY WITHERSPOON AND BEN WEBSTER/ JIMMY RUSHING (the Jimmy Rushing set, without Vince, is a separate performance) – produced by Ralph J. Gleason for PBS TV in 1962 – (the DVD issue of the original Rhino Home Video VHS release is out of print but is sometimes available used at Amazon.com - if ordering for North American DVD players, be sure to order the NTSC version) - also available on CD on Koch Jazz KOC CD-8561 – Vince Guaraldi here backs up vocalist Jimmy Witherspoon and saxophonist Ben Webster – 1962
  4. IN THE MARKETPLACE – 1966 documentary about the relationship of churches and society in San Francisco in the mid-1960’s – soundtrack by Vince Guaraldi, who also appears playing some of his music composed for his 1965 Grace Cathedral concert.
  5. ’67 WEST – documentary about Sunset Magazine, produced by Lee Mendelson with soundtrack by Vince Guaraldi.
  6. BICYLES ARE BEAUTIFUL – 1974 educational documentary produced by Lee Mendelson about bicycle safety for kids – soundtrack by Vince Guaraldi.
  7. BAY OF GOLD – 1965 documentary produced by Lee Mendelson about the history of San Francisco, with some music by Vince Guaraldi. It can be seen online at https://dice.sfsu.edu/collections/sfbatv/bundles/205204